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Concurrent Session Details

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Learning Solutions Conference & Expo 2011 Concurrent Sessions on Wednesday March 23, 2011
101 Increasing Interactivity in Virtual Classrooms
102 Mobile Learning Best Practices and Lessons Learned
103 Creating Self-paced Blended Learning
104 Case Study: In-house e-Learning Rapid Development
105 Social Media for Trainers
106 Supporting Performance at a Learner’s Five Moments of Need
107 LxD - Learner Experience Design
108 Assessments as the Core of a Learning Strategy
109 Micro-collaboration: Team Sharing to Build Highly Interactive Activities
110 LMS Selection and Implementation: Avoiding an L-M-Mess
111 Developing e-Learning for a Global Audience
112 How Simple Line Artwork Can Teach Concepts and Save Your Company Thousands
201 Success - Creation and Implementation of an e-Learning Certification Program
202 How to Select the Right Tool for the Right Purpose
203 Inserting e-Learning Interactivity into Technical Documents
204 How to Produce Consistently Engaging Virtual Online Sessions
205 Learning, Identity, and Social Media: The Changing Landscape
206 Creating Engaging Learning Designs
207 Rapid Analysis: Six Questions to Get Things Moving
208 Creating Interactive Flash Animations Using PowerPoint and Captivate
209 You Never Forget Your First Time: A Case Study of a Large-scale Project
210 Using Photoshop to Enhance Your Video...After Effects Too!
211 Critical Success Criteria before Launching a Learning Management System
212 Implementing SME-created Video
301 Money Talks - Find Gaps and Maximize ROI - A Case Study
302 Tools, Techniques, Tips for Low- to No-budget e-Learning
303 HTML5: Are We There Yet?
304 What Do You Communicate? Communication Styles in a Virtual Environment
305 Social Learning without the Technology - Seven Patterns to Try Out
306 Bringing Content to Life: Creating Simulations from Scratch
307 Emerging Instructional Design and Outcome Measurement Strategies
308 Linking mLearning to Your Business Strategy
309 Rapid e-Learning Development with SME Collaboration
310 Fine-tuning Your Blended Learning Development and Implementation Process
311 The Mac Unleashed
312 How Attractive Learning Leads to Engaging Content
401 Implementation: THE Critical Success Factor for Your e-Learning
402 Lessons Learned from 200 Rapid e-Learning Gurus
403 A Recipe for Integrating Your Course Content into SharePoint
404 Reaching New Heights: Interactive Webinars for Pharma Sales Reps
405 Twitter's Next Level: Integrating Twitter into Your Workplace
406 E-Learning Rules of Engagement
407 Seven Tips for Using Embedded, Mobile, and Observational Assessments
408 Managing Learning Content in Microsoft Word
409 Online Brainstorming Techniques for Development Teams
410 Developing Distance Learning with a One-person Team
411 A Metrics-Performance-Learning-Driven System: A Case Study
412 Eight Design Lessons We Can Learn from Museums
101

Increasing Interactivity in Virtual Classrooms

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

Most Webinars and virtual classroom sessions turn out to be talking-head videos (minus the head), and, as such, tend to be passive one-way presentations. But Live Online Learning Activities (LOLAs) provide an alternative, with a variety of approaches to increasing interactivity in the virtual classroom.

Participants in this session will get hands-on exploration of six different approaches to virtual interactivity: 1) The openers that preview main points, orient participants, establish ground rules, and reduce initial anxieties. 2) Interactive lectures combining the control and structure of lectures and the motivation of learning games. 3) Structured sharing activities that enable participants to share their best practices. 4) Interactive storytelling incorporating different forms of narratives. 5) Jolts deliver powerful wake-up calls in a brief period of time. 6) Textra activities combine the effective organization of well-written documents with the motivational impact of interactive games.

In this session, you will learn:
  • The factors that contribute to the boredom and passivity of Webinar sessions
  • How to use effective and active openers to begin your interactive webinar
  • How to use interactive lectures to combine structure and spontaneity
  • How to use structured sharing activities to empower participants to play an active role in the learning process
  • How to apply interactive storytelling to encourage participants to create, share, and process relevant stories
  • How to apply jolts to provide a wake up call
  • How to implement textra games to incorporate structure and engagement
Audience:
Novice and intermediate designers, developers, managers, and others with some previous experience with interactive classrooms.
Sivasailam "Thiagi" Thiagarajan
President
The Thiagi Group
Sivasailam "Thiagi" Thiagarajan designed his first computer game using FORTRAN, punched tape, and stolen time on a time-share mainframe at a research center. Since then he has designed, developed, and used a variety of computer and online training games, simulations, and interactive exercises. His current interest in interactive learning is the integration of studying and learning through his library-playground approach.
Tracy Tagliati
Chief Learning Officer
The Thiagi Group
Tracy Tagliati specializes in activities-based training for corporate clients in both instructor-led and web-based environments. Tracy’s mission is to help people improve their performance effectively and enjoyably. She has co-authored two books with Sivasailam “Thiagi” Thiagarajan on topics relating to interactive learning techniques, and has presented at numerous international conferences. Tracy is active in ASTD, ISPI, and the North American Simulation and Gaming Association (NASAGA). She holds a Master’s degree from Capella University, majoring in training and performance improvement, a Bachelor’s degree in business education, and several professional certificates.
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102

Mobile Learning Best Practices and Lessons Learned

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

Mobile learning draws a lot of excitement today, but it is SO much more than squeezing e-Learning into smaller screens. We will explore examples of Mobile Learning initiatives from a range of organizations and the interesting outcomes that have resulted.

Session participants will explore trends and the lessons learned and see various examples.

In this session, you will learn:

  • What is happening today with mobile learning
  • Lessons from the early implementers
  • The possibilities for performance support and job aids
  • The points to consider in advance
  • Various mobile design ideas
Audience: All designers, developers, managers, executives, and others interested in mLearning.
Judy Brown
Mobile Learning Analyst
mLearnopedia
Judy Brown has been involved in technology for learning for over 30 years, and with mobile learning since 1996. She now works entirely in the mobile learning area with government, corporations, and schools. Judy retired as the Emerging Technology Analyst in the Office of Learning and Information Technology at the University of Wisconsin System. She then founded and was Executive Director at the U.W. System of the Academic ADL Co-Lab with the U.S. Department of Defense. Following U.W. retirement, as a contractor she built and led the ADL Mobile Learning Team. She continues to curate the ADL Mobile Learning newsletter while working on specific mobile learning initiatives with Problem Solutions and others.
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103

Creating Self-paced Blended Learning

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

Your working culture emphasizes hands-on, real-time application of new skills, and high regulatory standards, and, for logistical reasons, you want to implement fully self-paced programs. So how do you allow learners to apply new skills and knowledge without a synchronous, facilitated event? How do you let learners demonstrate competence, and how do you drive them to existing tools and knowledge sources? Take a lesson from academic distance learning courses that provides learners with all the tools and documentation they need at the start of a program, then leads them through a blended program that plays to the range of learning styles and provides application opportunities.

Participants in this case-study session will explore the strategies employed by UBS to move compliance training to a fully self-paced model, without losing the vital application elements of synchronous training events. You’ll explore options for a self-paced blend – different activities and training modalities that maintain learner momentum and keep the program fresh. You’ll discover the strategies UBS and other clients of Interactive Services used to create “sticky zones” – driving learners to existing tools and knowledge bases, and ensuring they return!

In this session, you will learn:
  • How UBS met their challenges with a bespoke instructional framework and suite of learning activities
  • UBSs current, past, and future initiatives in this area
  • How other Interactive Services’ client strategies address the issue
  • Best practices for investing a training program with measurable, real-time demonstration-type application activities
Audience:
Intermediate designers, developers, and others prepared to contribute to discussion on distance learning, globalization, and compliance requirements.
Michael Tucci
Director of eLearning & Learning Infrastructure
UBS Financial Services
Michael Tucci was a technology consultant and implementer for small & medium size businesses. His work in education began as a consultant for PaineWebber where he created their first self-paced Financial Advisor training. After UBS bought PaineWebber, Michael became a Learning Infrastructure Manager and implemented the firm's first LMS Web-based e-Learning offerings. Since becoming e-Learning Manager as well, he led a team that created processes to streamline the production of quality self-paced learning that, relying on both internal and external staff, has led to many successful partnerships within the industry.
Matthew Plass
Chief Learning Officer
Interactive Services
Matt Plass is based in the U.K. and has been Interactive Services’ Chief Learning Officer for over four years. Matt has been in the training and education industry for 10 years, and has a background in Adult Learning and Instructional Design. He leads and oversees all instructional design and concept development at Interactive Services. Matt’s innovation and extraordinary skill has led him to success in the training and development industry.
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104

Case Study: In-house e-Learning Rapid Development

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

When you need to develop many e-Learning courses, “fast, faster, and fastest” are terms typically used to describe the process. Can you accomplish rapid, in-house e-Learning development while at the same time keep the e-Learning course from being a dreaded page-turner?

Participants in this case-study session will learn how a Time Warner Cable development team accomplishes e-Learning development in four weeks or less. You’ll learn the processes that allow achievement of rapid development, and how the Learning group became a strategic business partner, established standardized planning, and created approval processes. These achievements led to an effective four-week e-Learning development timeframe, without sacrificing relevant graphics, audio, and customized e-Learning interactions. 

In this session, you will learn:
  • The importance of the Learning group being a strategic part of the business
  • That proper planning and instructional design don’t have to get sacrificed for fast e-Learning development
  • How pre-e-Learning development content approval can be fast and effective
  • That you should not exclude appropriate graphics, audio, and learner engagement in rapid, in-house e-Learning development
Audience: Novice designers, developers, and others considering implementing in-house e-Learning development. This session is ideal for participants wanting to reduce e-Learning development timeframes.
Kevin Yount
Senior Instructional Designer
Time Warner Cable
Kevin Yount has created e-Learning, instructor-led, simulated field practice, and blended learning products for the telecommunications and retail industries for the past five years. Prior to entering the instructional design field, Kevin taught in secondary education for four years in both urban and rural school districts in Indiana and North Carolina. He holds a B.S. in Business Education from Ball State University, and a M.Ed. in Instructional Systems Technology from the University of North Carolina – Charlotte.
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105

Social Media for Trainers

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

Much of the current talk on social media and social learning occurs at the “50,000-foot level.” Practitioners complain that it offers few ideas for application to their work.

Participants in this session will get specific, concrete training and learning activities, as well as exercises using popular social media technologies. Effective use of social media technologies can help to enhance and extend workplace training and learning efforts.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to define assorted technologies at their root rather than their face value
  • How to identify opportunities for extending and enhancing current programs beyond traditional confines
  • How to employ assorted tools in providing pre-, post-, and inter-session learning work
  • How to utilize social-media technologies to support sustained community
Audience: Intermediate designers, developers, and others with a basic familiarity with popular social media technologies such as Facebook and Twitter. (Note: This is not “Twitter 101.”)
Jane Bozarth
eLearning Coordinator
State of North Carolina
Jane Bozarth is a veteran classroom trainer who transitioned to eLearning in the late 1990s and has never looked back. As leader of the State of North Carolina’s award-winning eLearning program, Jane specializes in finding low-cost ways of providing online training solutions. She is the author of eLearning Solutions on a Shoestring, Better than Bullet Points: Creating Engaging eLearning with PowerPoint, From Analysis to Evaluation, and Social Media for Trainers. Jane holds a doctorate in training and development.
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106

Supporting Performance at a Learner’s Five Moments of Need

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

To successfully perform, learners continually pass through five phases that require support. Typical training industry focus is upon two of these moments of need: 1) when people are learning how to do something for the first time, and 2) when people are expanding the breadth and depth of what they have learned. These first two moments of need are considered the “formal” side of learning. But there’s an informal side as well that comprises three additional moments of need for performers: 3) When performers need to act upon what they have learned (which includes planning what they will do, remembering what they may have forgotten, or adapting their performance to a unique situation.) 4) When problems arise, or things break or don’t work the way they were intended. And 5) When people need to learn a new way of doing something (which requires them to change skills that are deeply ingrained in their performance practices.) Few organizations have addressed these final three needs adequately. And those who do so find that it dramatically strengthens how they meet their formal learning requirements.

Ssession participants will learn how an orchestrated performance support strategy can address all five of these moments of need.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to assess the strengths and counter the weaknesses of the Virtual Classroom
  • How Performance Support fits into your overarching learning and training strategy
  • How to gain access to a broad range of resources to help you design, develop, and deliver performance support at all five moments of need.
Audience: This session is appropriate for all levels of designers, developers, managers, and others.
Conrad Gottfredson
Chief Learning Strategist
APPLY Synergies
Conrad A. Gottfredson, the chief learning strategist at APPLY Synergies, has deep experience in organizational learning, collaborative development, knowledge management, online learning, performance support, and instructional design and development. Conrad is the original developer of the Learning at the Five Moments of Need framework now in use around the world. He has worked with many of the world’s largest organizations, helping them attain higher levels of learning agility. Conrad's experience includes the design and deployment of large-scale knowledge-management and performance-support systems within multinational corporations. He holds a PhD degree is in instructional psychology and technology.
Bob Mosher
Chief Learning Evangelist
APPLY Synergies
Bob Mosher, the chief learning evangelist at APPLY Synergies, has been an active and influential leader in the learning and training industry for over 30 years, and is renowned worldwide for his pioneering role in eLearning and new approaches to learning. Before co-founding APPLY Synergies consultancy with Conrad Gottfredson, Bob served as the chief learning evangelist for Ontuitive, director of learning strategy and evangelism for Microsoft, and executive director of education for Element K. He is an influential voice in the IT training industry, speaking at conferences and participating in industry associations.
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107

LxD - Learner Experience Design

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

In order to create great learning experiences, instructional designers need to ensure that the e-Learning they create is usable and learner-centered. Good usability can't ensure that e-Learning participants will learn (that still requires good instructional design), but bad usability can prevent learners from getting what they need out of an e-Learning course. The fields of User Experience Design (UxD) and Usability Engineering have made huge strides in the last 15 years, and many of the lessons from those fields can help e-Learning designers made better, more effective e-Learning. User Experience Design is dedicated to understanding the end-user and creating the best possible experience for each individual user. UxD can help e-Learning designers better understand their users' abilities, contexts, and constraints. It can also help them learn cost-effective ways to use usability testing to evaluate and refine their e-Learning design.

Participants in this session will learn how to use Ux analysis tools, like field research analysis and personas, how to do a heuristic walk-though of an e-Learning course, and how to do quick and inexpensive user testing.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How the concerns of UxD professionals are different than the concerns of LxD professionals
  • How to ensure that your e-Learning is user-centered
  • Best practices for e-Learning interface design
Audience: Novice, intermediate, and advanced designers developers, managers, executives, and others who want to create more interactive e-Learning courses.
Julie Dirksen
Learning Strategy Consultant
Usable Learning
Julie Dirksen is a consultant and instructional designer with more than 15 years’ experience creating highly interactive eLearning experiences for clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to technology startups to grant-funded research initiatives. She’s interested in using neuroscience, change management, and persuasive technology to promote sustainable long-term learning and behavior change. Her MS degree in instructional systems technology is from Indiana University, and she’s been an adjunct faculty member at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. She is the author of Design For How People Learn.
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108

Assessments as the Core of a Learning Strategy

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

Training departments often develop assessments and evaluations as a final component of training design, an add-on to content. But assessments and evaluations provide stakeholders critical data regarding workforce capability, and they should be the core of your learning strategy. This session will explore strategies to shift from the common content-centric development paradigm to focus learning strategy on enhanced assessment and evaluation to provide more high-value data to stakeholders regarding workforce capability and training’s contribution to the business.

Session participants will learn techniques for evaluating reporting needs, and explore several designs that could address many of the needs using different content embedding strategies. Understanding that evaluation is a critical focus area for most training departments, participants will learn how to leverage tools to more successfully gather and report on training's contribution to the business.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to decide between different content-embedding strategies to use in your organization
  • Techniques to provide valuable data for ALL levels of evaluation
  • Techniques to collect multiple measures to validate metrics and enable aggregation or parsing of collected data
  • Techniques to adapt assessment assets at many levels for reuse in multiple contexts
  • A simple tool to expand one good question into deep question banks
Audience: Intermediate and advanced designers, developers, and managers who have some experience with authoring, administering, and managing assessments or evaluation programs. A basic understanding of LMS functions and rules, assessment designs and levels of evaluation, and Web page coding is recommended, but not required.
David Glow
Chief Learning Architect
Business Critical Learning
David Glow is the chief learning architect with Business Critical Learning. With over 15 years’ experience developing and delivering learning solutions, David has been in several roles, including instructor, program developer, department chair, LMS superadministrator and instructional designer. David has worked in higher education and industry with clients ranging from startups to Fortune 100 organizations across several industries.
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109

Micro-collaboration: Team Sharing to Build Highly Interactive Activities

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

Collaborating with subject matter experts (SMEs) is key to successfully creating highly interactive online learning activities, especially games and simulations. SMEs do not understand the design and development process necessary to create interactive activities, but without the expert's tacit knowledge it is difficult for designers and developers to build in AI. This session explores factors that enable team collaboration at the program level and at the individual team and project level. Creating interactive online learning objects requires the combined efforts of a domain expert, a project manager, instructional designer, graphic artist, and Web programmers. Members of this team must respect each other's expertise, build mutual respect, and engage in creative idea, design, and code formation. ISD people are experts too!

Participants in this session will learn how formal and informal leadership can increase the potential for team collaboration through documented workflow sharing, visual representation techniques, project management techniques, and especially through user testing. Successful software development workflows combine these factors with an adherence to certain Agile Development methods, emphasizing reflection and a formative evaluation plan. You’ll get case studies for best practices and a worksheet to guide you through a reflective exercise of things to consider with your own team.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How informal leadership methods can enable collaboration with faculty experts
  • A micro-collaboration model for engaging expertise sharing
  • How to create a checklist of operational tasks to encourage team collaboration
  • What can be done to increase team member passion and involvement in your project
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, managers of e-Learning departments, and others.
Jon Aleckson
CEO
Web Courseworks
In addition to his role with Web Courseworks, Jon Aleckson serves as an adjunct professor for the University of Wisconsin, Platteville. Jon earned his PhD degree in educational leadership—distance education—at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and uses his expertise as an educational product development specialist. He writes “Managing eLearning,” a blog on current eLearning trends and released his book MindMeld in 2011 with co-author Penny Ralston-Berg.
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110

LMS Selection and Implementation: Avoiding an L-M-Mess

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

Evaluating, selecting, and implementing a LMS is complex and disruptive. It involves business needs analysis, learning strategy alignment, product evaluation and selection, careful planning, and attention to countless implementation details. You must make complex product configuration decisions that have long-term implications. You must map and migrate data. You must be redeploy, test, and tweak courseware and implement various systems integrations. You must consider sponsors and stakeholders throughout the organization; training, IT, and HR functions must work together effectively to make it all happen.

Participants in this session will learn a proven process for LMS evaluation and selection, and a framework for thorough and effective LMS implementation planning. You’ll learn common pitfalls and how to avoid them. Participants who are considering or embarking on LMS selection and/or implementation will gain invaluable insights into the process and its inherent problems and challenges, and you’ll gain useful methods and information to help you address these challenges in your own organizations.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to narrow the field and evaluate the LMS vendors that are right for your organization
  • How to use scorecards and scoring methods to make objective decisions
  • The types of configuration decisions you must make — and their long-term implications
  • How to approach data migration
  • How to manage courseware migration and interoperability testing
  • How to develop use cases for user acceptance testing (UAT)
  • How to establish and maintain effective working relationships with IT and HR
Audience: Designers, developers, and others who can accurately define what an LMS does and have some experience participating in medium-to-large project implementations, ideally with projects that involve technology.
Steve Foreman
President
InfoMedia Designs
Steve Foreman is President of InfoMedia Designs, a provider of eLearning infrastructure consulting services and technology solutions to Fortune 500 companies. Since establishing his consulting practice in 1983, Steve has spent 20+ years working with forward-looking companies to find new and effective ways to apply computer technology to support human performance. His work includes enterprise learning strategy, LMS selection and implementation, learning-technology architecture and integration, expert-knowledge harvesting, knowledge management, and innovative performance-support solutions that blend working and learning.
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111

Developing e-Learning for a Global Audience

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

The Nature Conservancy developed, along with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Program of Work on Protected Areas (PoWPA) e-Learning curriculum. This session describes the issues of working with geographically dispersed SMEs, authors, and developers by illustrating best practices and demonstrating examples. In addition, the session will cover developing for multiple cultures, five languages, and accessibility through sharing our experience with translating content and providing alternative solutions for low-bandwidth audiences.

This case-study session will show participants how to work with a geographically dispersed project team, and how to design content that can be more easily translated in multiple languages. You’ll learn how to design content for multiple cultures and for accessibility.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to work with a geographically dispersed project team
  • How to design content that can be more easily translated in multiple languages
  • How to design content for multiple cultures
  • How to design content for varying bandwidth requirements
Audience: Novice and iIntermediate designers, developers, and others with some basic experience with developing courses for the Internet.
Chanda Carpenter
Learning Manager
The Nature Conservancy
Chanda Carpenter is an eLearning Developer with The Nature Conservancy’s Technology Learning Center. Specializing in multimedia and graphic design, Chanda has more than 10 years of experience developing online training and communications programs that focus on delivering an interactive, engaging experience to the user. She has been the recipient of several national awards for her web and print design work. Prior to conservation, Chanda worked in the finance and telecommunication industries.
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112

How Simple Line Artwork Can Teach Concepts and Save Your Company Thousands

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 10:45 AM

E-Learning developers burdened with the task of finding and manipulating stock art and graphics for learning materials can take a lot of time to do it. Not only does a longer process cost companies money, the stock art and software used to manipulate the graphics can add up real quick as well. And more importantly, many companies find manipulated stock art may not effectively teach the concepts they want their learners to understand.

Session participants will learn how the use of simple line artwork in distance learning materials can effectively teach concepts, resonate with learners, be created by less-than-accomplished artists, and help make large cuts to the distance learning budget.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to use simple line art to resonate with your audience
  • How simple line art can effectively teach complex concepts and teach your audience how to become better visual thinkers
  • That creating simple line art can be done by a less-than-accomplished artist, maybe even YOU
  • How open source applications can assist the development of artwork, saving your company significant expenses
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, and others familiar with the basic processes that surround the development of distance learning materials.
Will Miller
Instructional Designer
Edline
Will Miller has been involved in almost every aspect of distance learning including instructional design, project management, graphic design, and distance-learning development. Before joining Edline, Will instructed multiple adult-education courses to diverse learners and developed course curricula that gained statewide recognition among community colleges in Illinois. Will holds a M.S.Ed. in Workforce Education and Development.
Kenneth Torgerson
Strategic Initiatives Program Manager
Pearson School Systems
Ken Torgerson has been involved in technology and education for nearly 20 years, teaching the Hmong language, teaching English as a Foreign Language in Taiwan, and supporting and training K-12 educators and administrators on student information systems for Apple, Pearson, and THiNQ Ed. Ken now devises strategies for improving learning about products at Pearson School Systems. He holds a B.A. in Anthropology from Brigham Young University and an M.A. in Education from the University of Phoenix.
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201

Success - Creation and Implementation of an e-Learning Certification Program

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

During the recession of the last two to three years, Dampp-Chaser was faced with potential layoffs.  Dampp-Chaser owners made a conscious choice to invest in training in e-Learning methodologies and technologies, rather than letting people go. Focused study and training allowed completion of the e-Learning certification program using only internal resources.  

Participants in this case-study session will learn step-by-step the process by which Dampp-Chaser created an e-Learning certification program from scratch to replace existing classroom training. You’ll learn the instructional design basis, the requirement for sensible graphic design, the internal quality assurance processes, as well as methods for pilot testing with a sample of learners. You’ll learn how they implemented the e-Learning certification program, a critical component that is sometimes overlooked, that involves managing cultural change along with managing consumer marketing to the learner. You’ll also get metrics documenting the success of the certification program along with a return on investment calculation demonstrating cost effectiveness.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How a small business can create e-Learning programs with its own resources
  • Some of the challenges encountered in the creative process
  • How a high tolerance for mistakes is critical to new venture success
  • The practical importance of implementation in the roll out of e-Learning programs
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, and others with some awareness of e-Learning principles in general and the Articulate software suite in particular.
Roger Wheelock
Executive VP
Dampp-Chaser Corp.
Roger Wheelock holds Master of Chemistry and Master of Business Administration degrees. He has provided classroom training in regulatory compliance, chemical toxicology, and piano technology. He specializes in making technical concepts clear and understandable to learners lacking strong technical backgrounds. Most recently he developed and implemented an e-Learning certification program for piano technicians across North America.
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202

How to Select the Right Tool for the Right Purpose

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

With so many technologies available, it can be hard to decide which ones best meet the training needs of your learners and your organization. In this session, we’ll examine the kinds of tools available, the constraints around each kind, and how to choose the right tools for your instructional goals.

In this session, you will learn:
  • What categories of tools you can use to create training
  • Which tools to use synchronously and asynchronously
  • The best practices for each type of tool
  • The constraints around the various tool types
Audience: Beginner designers and developers. There are no prerequisites.
Mary Arnold
MA Consulting
Mary Arnold is a Gen-X digital native who got pulled into working with technology in her first job out of college, where she was frequently called on by her co-workers to explain how to use the user-spiteful computer system in her office. Having grown up with computers (thanks, Dad!), she’s never been afraid to experiment with them until they work the way a user would expect. She is currently working as an instructional technologist, uses Flash extensively for her online learning projects, and probably spends more time than she should in social media.
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203

Inserting e-Learning Interactivity into Technical Documents

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

It is no longer acceptable to provide technical documents that are static and dry. More and more, technical writers are discovering the necessity and expediency of including interactive elements such as those typically found in e-Learning applications into their technical documents.

Whatever application is used to create technical documents, the de facto standard for distribution is Adobe Acrobat. Participants will investigate two major options to including interactive elements in electronic technical documents. The first is the inclusion of SWF mini-apps into Acrobat documents. The second is the more manual approach of building interactive media-rich e-Learning elements in Adobe Acrobat. You will be amazed at what’s possible!

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to generate PDF documents from applications like Adobe Captivate
  • How to generate e-Learning lessons and insert them into PDF documents
  • How to build interactive elements manually in PDF documents
  • How to include images, audio, video, and text (easier said than done)
  • How to create multiple-choice questions directly in Acrobat
  • How to navigate to different pages in a document, dependent on user choice
  • Step-by-step instructions so that you can do all this yourself
Audience: Beginner and intermediate technical writers and others interested in enhancing technical documentation who have a basic understanding of technical writing and e-Learning principles.
Joe Ganci
President
eLearning Joe
Joe Ganci is president of eLearning Joe, a custom learning company. Since 1983 he has been involved in every aspect of multimedia and learning development. Joe is considered a guru for his expertise in eLearning development, and he consults with clients worldwide. His eLearning tool reviews appear each month in Learning Solutions Magazine, and he has been the recipient of several awards for his work in eLearning, including being selected as an eLearning Guild Master. His mission is to improve the quality of eLearning with practical approaches that work. He loves to help others achieve their goals.
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204

How to Produce Consistently Engaging Virtual Online Sessions

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

When planning to adopt virtual classroom technology for training delivery, successful teams need a clear idea of what management, instructional, and technical issues to consider and what techniques to use. The e-Learning Guild has been delivering Online Forums since 2005 and has produced hundreds of hours of online content. This session will describe key learning from the producing these sessions.

Session participants will learn how to develop a reliable, repeatable process for delivering consistently engaging and relatively disaster-free virtual online sessions. Attend this session and learn best practices that will help you launch your own virtual online program successfully.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to effectively manage the process, from planning to evaluation
  • The recommended roles for an effective online training program team
  • How to determine how much coaching a SME needs to be an effective presenter
  • Tips for avoiding and troubleshooting technical issues
Audience:
Novice and intermediate designers, developers, managers, SMEs, and others who have a basic understanding of virtual classroom tools and capabilities.
Karen Hyder
Principal
Kaleidoscope Training and Consulting
Karen Hyder has been teaching trainer-training programs for virtual classes and coaching online presenters since 1999. She has produced hundreds of online sessions, including for The eLearning Guild’s Online Forums, Thought Leaders Webinars, and Best of… Webinars. Karen uses the trainer competencies of CompTIA’s Certified Technical Trainer (CTT+) to help technical trainers and subject-matter experts prepare for online sessions, master online presentation skills, and engage learners throughout sessions. She frequently speaks at industry events on using virtual classroom tools to support learning. Karen co-authored The eLearning Guild’s Handbook on Synchronous eLearning, and authored Up and Running with WebEx Training Center for lynda.com.
Chris Benz
Director of Online Events
The eLearning Guild
Chris Benz is a communications jack-of-all-trades. In his more than 25-year career, Chris has been a trainer, instructional designer and developer, conference manager, award-winning writer and author, information designer, DITA consultant, project manager, department manager, operations director, and sales engineer. Chris is a co-founder of and instructor for Duke University’s Certificate in Technical Communication program, a Society for Technical Communication (STC) Associate Fellow, and a past member of the STC Board of Directors. In his spare time, Chris likes to get in over his head on home-improvement projects.
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205

Learning, Identity, and Social Media: The Changing Landscape

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

With social media becoming ubiquitous, the question of identity and representation across both physical and virtual environments is now central to our personal and professional lives – impacting how we interact with others, consume information, and gain new skills and knowledge.

The use of social learning has evolved from a nascent spider-web of technology into a structured framework used in both higher education and corporate learning. Participants in this session will explore the effectiveness of social learning design and the impact of learner representation in these environments. We’ll focus on two specific questions: How does an “uber-connected” world affect learner identity and online learning activity? How is the design of learning affected by social media?

In this session, you will learn:
  • How social media affects online representation in learning environments
  • How to design active learning communities
  • Behaviors to anticipate in learning communities
  • The social media elements that are conducive to learning
Audience: Novice participants

Technology: Social media, virtual environments
Brandon Carson
Strategic Lead
Digital Learning, EntireNet
Brandon Carson is an award-winning instructional designer who for the past 15 years has been designing face-to-face, print, computer-based, and Web-based instruction and training for global audiences. As an instructional designer, he has delivered and led numerous presentations, workshops, seminars, and tutorials on a wide variety of instructional design and training-related issues. Brandon created the Mobile Design and Development curriculum for Yahoo!’s engineering organization. In his distant past, he was a book builder/designer and letterpress printer.
Enzo Silva
Sr. Instructional Designer
Success Factors, an SAP Company
Enzo Silva, senior instructional designer for Success Factors, is an avid learner and instructor who worked in the language-learning field for many years in his home country of Brazil. Enzo is involved in learning mediated by social media, virtual worlds, and games. He currently resides in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area.
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206

Creating Engaging Learning Designs

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

You know you don’t want to produce another mediocre learning design, but you can’t seem to come up with something interesting. OR you lead a team of designers, and too much of what you’re seeing is, well, boring. OR you’ve been successful at producing interesting designs, but you’re not sure you could explain how you got there so that others could follow in your footsteps. This session helps improve the outcomes of the instructional design process by facilitating the creation of interesting learning, providing participants with tools that foster and enable creativity, and establishing context around the nature and implications of engagement.

Participants in this session will focus on actionable strategies for creating engaging designs, with emphasis on creativity, engagement, and collaboration. You’ll explore a model for producing engaging designs, as well as get a simple tool that can be used to guide you through the process.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to distinguish engaging versus boring learning designs (from the learner’s perspective)
  • Tactics to “spark” creativity for virtually any type of learning challenge
  • The interplay between creativity and collaboration and how to use it to your advantage
  • How to use a simple tool to guide you through a creative process that will result in an engaging design.
Audience: Novice to intermediate designers of any kind of learning, and managers of designers who have at least a basic understanding of instructional design. It will also help for learners to arrive at the session having in mind one or more learning designs that they find engaging as well as some they find boring.
Joseph Fournier
Senior eLearning Designer
WellPoint
Joe Fournier has been involved in e-Learning since the early 1990’s, and in learning design and development since the mid 1980’s. Joe is passionate about helping people develop competency in creating more interesting, interactive designs and learning to use the tools that make this possible. He is a frequent speaker at learning industry events.
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207

Rapid Analysis: Six Questions to Get Things Moving

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

Marketing professionals have long relied on Albert Humphrey’s simple-but-useful SWOT analysis when time and cost prohibit a more in-depth analysis. As experts in training and performance, we must be nimble enough to scale our own approach to analysis in a similar fashion, but without foregoing a systematic process. In this interactive session, you’ll learn the six questions that constitute an “ANSWER analysis,” an approach to rapid needs analysis in learning and development that helps one gather and evaluate key factors before developing a solution. Using all or part of our ANSWER analysis tool can increase your abilities to add value to your organization and to develop solutions aligned to the needs and opportunities within your unique environment. This helps you build credibility as an internal consultant who helps your stakeholders understand exactly how training and development contributes.

Session participants will see case studies of the utility of the ANSWER methodology at several Fortune 500 companies and you’ll participate in an iterative group exercise that lets you practice what you are learning. Case studies will detail approaches and results from analyses conducted at a global financial institution and an association that specializes in risk management.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to facilitate a rapid analysis of organizational needs
  • How to customize an analysis methodology to suit your work context
  • How to produce a summary report of the analysis
  • How to introduce an analysis methodology to your organization (one that can easily go viral)
Audience: Intermediate designers, developers, and managers who want to improve their analysis abilities.
Michael Noble
Chief Learning Officer
Allen Communication Learning Services
Michael Noble, PhD, became the CLO of Allen Communication Learning Services in 2005. Michael consults with Allen’s major accounts and strategic partners, identifying enterprise-wide targets and objectives, conducting various types of analyses, and recommending new technologies. He has presented at conferences for ISPI, ASTD, and The eLearning Guild. Before joining Allen in 1998, Michael taught at the University of Louisiana. He currently teaches at the University of Utah.
Michael Hassett
Director of Project Management
Allen Communication
Michael Hassett, Ph.D., brought 20 years of experience in education, technical communication, and project management with him when he joined Allen in 2006. He received his Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Professional Communication from Iowa State and has been a professor at two major western universities. With Charles Kostelnick, he published Shaping Information: The Rhetoric of Visual Conventions (2003). Michael has managed projects for Farmers, Wachovia, Discover, and the Risk Management Association.
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208

Creating Interactive Flash Animations Using PowerPoint and Captivate

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

Most e-Learning courses use Flash animations to demonstrate concepts and add interactivity, but creating an interactive Flash animation can be both expensive and time consuming. While good animations can help make e-Learning materials be much more effective, all too often, cost is a limiting factor.

In this session, participants will see a demonstration of a simple cost-effective process for creating interactive Flash animations using PowerPoint and Captivate that will allow virtually anyone who can use PowerPoint to create professional looking, highly-interactive Flash animations.

In this session, you will learn:
  • Design ideas for easy-to-create animations
  • How to create effective animations in PowerPoint
  • How to convert PowerPoint animations to SWF files using Captivate
  • How to combine multiple simple animations to create a rich interactive animation in Captivate
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, and others with a basic knowledge of designing and developing training materials using PowerPoint.
Stephen Acheson
Instructional Designer
John Deere
Stephen Acheson works with diverse teams to design and develop training modules for a worldwide audience. Steve helped develop and implement the global process milestones by which all company training development is evaluated. He has led several cross-divisional teams in designing and developing company-wide training on a wide range of subjects. Steve received his B.A. in Education from Warner University and his M.A. in Performance and Training from the University of Northern Iowa. He has over 25 years of experience in the field of education and training.
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209

You Never Forget Your First Time: A Case Study of a Large-scale Project

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

Large-scale e-Learning projects can, by themselves, be overwhelming and intimidating. You have a recipe for a truly unforgettable experience when it includes one or more “firsts,” such as the first project requiring real upper management support, the first project to present an audience of 3,000+ learners using a different style for instruction, or the first project ever for a new e-Learning instructional designer. Or how about the first project with very real and serious consequences if it’s not done right, and the first highly visible project being watched closely by those who can shut it down. How do you plan and implement a successful first large-scale project where the costs of a fumble are high?

Participants in this interactive case-study session will learn from a team that successfully planned and implemented a data practices e-Learning curriculum. The in-house, home-grown team in the case study had limited educational backgrounds in e-Learning and limited practical experience as well, and works in a county-level government organization with scarce resources and a culture of “because we’ve always done it that way.” You’ll learn processes, learnings, and tips that will help you achieve your own successes with your first large-scale e-Learning project.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to develop a plan for a large-scale project
  • How to prepare the organization for success
  • How to prepare your project team
  • Helpful questions to ask along the way to ensure the project stays on task and achieves the business result
  • Tips to avoid pitfalls
Audience: Novice project managers, designers, developers, and others.
Anne Gaffney-Iehl
Training Specialist Supervisor
Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health
Anne Gaffney-Iehl has been a group facilitator and trainer since 1999. She holds a Master's in Social Work and a Master's in Instructional Design for Online Learning. In 2007, Anne developed, and now manages, the e-Learning program for the Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department. While occassionally putting on the Instructional Designer hat, she spends most of her time managing collaborative projects and coaching team members on design, development, and group facilitation. She played an instrumental role in the development of a county-wide e-Learning group focused on developing standards, sharing experience, and changing culture to use e-Learning effectively.
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210

Using Photoshop to Enhance Your Video...After Effects Too!

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

Having to capture eyeballs is a given in the world of e-Learning, because if you don’t get the learner’s eyes looking at the screen, you can’t train them. While our e-Learning productions aren’t going to look like Avatar, there are ways we can spice up our learning videos and even create “video” from scratch using some simple tools in Photoshop or After Effects — or both! Did you know that fairly complex animations are possible in Photoshop? After Effects is well known as an animation tool, but with Photoshop you can do almost as much, even create composite images. (If you don’t know what composite video is, you can come to this session and find out.)

Participants in this session will learn how easy it is to create motion graphics in both Photoshop and After Effects and apply them to a video project. With the software installed on your laptop, you’ll be able to follow along and get a “live” tutorial.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to leverage Photoshop and After Effects to spice up your video
  • How to create simple animations
  • Why Photoshop and After Effects are such good tools to use
  • The things that make good eyeball-grabbing animation
  • What video compositing is and how to do it
Audience: Beginner-to-advanced designers, developers, managers, and others interested in enhancing their use of video. An understanding of layers in Photoshop will be helpful.
Stephen Haskin
Principal
Industrial Strength Learning
Stephen Haskin, the principal of Industrial Strength Learning, started in video production and computing in the 1970s. He has worked with digital video and eLearning since the late 1980s, and has been at the forefront of streaming media. Previously, Stephen was a producer and director of film and video and won many awards for his work. He worked for the University of Michigan for several years, but has now returned to the private sector where he currently directs and consults for distance-learning projects and video. Stephen frequently speaks at conferences and seminars, is the author of three books, and is writing a fourth book about media and learning.
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211

Critical Success Criteria before Launching a Learning Management System

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

The biggest issue of not having a successful learning management implementation is the lack of planning that goes into managing the content. Many companies don't know what content they have, and when large content migrations take place or must be organized in the learning management system … the outcomes fall short of expectations. There are certain success criteria required for the successful implementation of a Learning Management System.  

Session participants will get tips on how best to approach the content management issue. You’ll see a sample content management plan to get an idea of what goes into one and learn how you might use this information to create your own. You’ll learn about vendor partnerships, IT involvement, content management, and project management, with special emphasis given to the need for strategizing a content management plan. You’ll also learn about XML, cascading style sheets, master documents, and the use of meta-data to search and categorize assets.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How content management is a critical success element when optimizing or implementing a LMS
  • The elements of a good content management plan for digital assets
  • The advantages and disadvantages of content management systems
  • The benefits of XML, cascading style sheets, master documents, and meta-data in structuring a content management system
Audience: Intermediate and advanced designers, developers, managers, and others familiar with what a learning management system does. You should also have a basic familiarity with Web technology terms such as XML, and some understanding or experiences with content authoring tools like Adobe Captivate will help.
Newton Moore
Director for Training
Children's Memorial Hospital
Newton Moore has 12 years of experience integrating instructional materials for learning management deployment including Learning Content Management Systems. He has a strong working knowledge of developing Web-based, instructional material including building API’s in HTML and JavaScript, and the ActionScript coding required for learning management HTML protocol communication. Newton is experienced in usability studies, user acceptance testing, system failure and recovery activities, and regression test methods. With several years' experience designing change-management solutions for enterprise technology implementations, he is a Lean Six Sigma Certified Black Belt. Newton holds a Ph.D. in Instructional Systems Design and Technology.
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212

Implementing SME-created Video

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 01:00 PM

Video is an easy tool to use and it can be part of a SME's rapid development kit. Video communicates to learners by providing a connection with the viewer.

Participants in this case-study session will learn how JetBlue University is adding new tools to the SME Curriculum Developers. The tool is used to create two-to-five minute videos. You’ll see lessons learned and detailed steps taken to roll out video to SMEs.

In this session, you will learn:
  • The video tool selection process
  • An implementation plan to roll out video to SME Curriculum Developers
  • About supporting SMEs in video development
  • The lessons learned
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, managers, and others who want to understand how to implement video at their organization.
Shana Storey
Manager Learning Solutions
JetBlue Airways
Shana Storey has led the Learning Solutions team at JetBlue Airways since 2009 and has been a part of Learning Technologies since 2005. Shana’s focus is on building partnerships to manage and support the development of courseware initiatives across JetBlue Airways. She has experience designing training solutions for aviation, pharmaceutical sales training, and legal-based curriculum. Shana holds a Certificate in Training Management from N.Y.U. and a M.F.A. in Mixed Media Art. When she is not focusing her attention coaching a team of talented developers, Shana is actively involved in traditional maritime skills and sailing.
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301

Money Talks - Find Gaps and Maximize ROI - A Case Study

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

Traditional training-needs assessment can be much improved upon with the addition of e-Learning. Too often, e-Learning module topics are based on what the customer “feels” the need is. Some developers dig deeper, talking to employees to try and get at the root of the problem. That's what we were doing, but we were finding out what the employees did and did not know, however this did not translate into what they could and could not do. Utilizing Adobe Captivate, we created an assessment that told us, not what the employees knew, but what they could do. Analyzing the data from this assessment told us not only where the weaknesses were on an individual level, but what types of problems caused hesitation, required other resources, or proved to be a bottleneck. The results were surprising. One test group got an hour-and-a-half of face-to-face training and showed a 12% increase in quality. Another group, after taking the 15-minute e-Learning module, showed an astonishing quality increase of 95%. How? By utilizing a blend of pre-test, personalized answer dissection, and post test. This saved over $400,000 per year, all from a module built in about three days.

Participants in this case-study session will learn how to use e-Learning as a needs assessment, how to analyze data from your assessments to draw sound conclusions, and how beneficial this technique can be.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to create a basic assessment in Adobe Captivate
  • How to change the assessment based on user input
  • How to structure the post-assessment module for maximum impact
  • How to avoid potential pitfalls
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, and managers.
Garrin Goebel
E-Learning Specialist
Department Of Veterans Affairs
Garrin Goebel began his career as a classroom instructor. His innovative approach to adult learning and inventive use of technology garnered praise and awards from both the private and public sector, so his transition into e-Learning over three years ago was a natural one. Garrin established the e-Learning department within his branch of the VA and has pioneered it for the last several years. Many branches in the government have benchmarked his e-Learning courses, as have private sector companies. Based on the results so far, funding has increased the size of his department 500%, with greater increase on the horizon.
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302

Tools, Techniques, Tips for Low- to No-budget e-Learning

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

Designers, Developers, Trainers and their leadership often approach training and learning with purse strings pulled tight. This is understandable, but it shouldn’t inhibit creative solutions. Often it simply takes a little creative thinking and knowledge of available tools to architect an impactful and advanced tech-inspired learning solution that yields results. Today you can do it with minimal to no leverage of your training budget. This session offers tools, techniques, and tips to develop tech-infused learning with little to no impact on the budget, but a significant impact on the bottom line. For example, imagine using animated avatars in your e-Learning course without spending $10,000 for the appropriate software. How valuable would a technique to do this be?

Participants in this session will get a blueprint of alternative technologies and learn how they can use those technologies to help them meet training and learning goals without impacting the budget. You’ll get the inspiration to be creative and bold in your future learning proposals. This session will be empowering to e-Learning designers, trainers, and training managers. “Learner inspired, CFO approved” will be stamp of approval on your future training initiatives.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to identify low-to-no-budget tools and techniques
  • How to apply low-to-no-budget tools and techniques to your learning solutions
  • How to re-evaluate learning proposals
  • How to better navigate training budget restrictions  
Audience: Beginning, intermediate, and advanced designers, developers, trainers, and managers with a working knowledge of e-Learning design and the cost considerations associated with it.   
Terrence Wing
Chief Learning Evangelist
Liquid Learn
Terrence Wing’s experience has spanned multiple industries and disciplines including the U.S. Military, Retail, Distribution, Sales, and Executive Management. Terrence founded Liquid Learn in 2005 (formerly Workforce Performance Partners). He re-engineered his organization for a durable future as a vendor of modern learning resources. Terrence spearheads his organization’s use of blended learning, including Social Media, eLearning, mobile learning, and the corporate classroom, to develop learning products that enhance their customer’s Leadership ability. He holds a M.A. in Corporate Training and Development from Penn State.
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303

HTML5: Are We There Yet?

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

The Web development world is on fire with debate about HTML5, a new set of Web technologies that can deliver rich, interactive experiences on both desktops and mobile devices. But the e-Learning industry remains heavily invested in Flash development, even as Flash delivery remains unavailable or uncertain on most mobile devices. And it's not hard to see why Flash is still king. HTML5 development tools and understanding remain in short supply in the e-Learning and mLearning industries.

This session will provide an overview of what HTML5 is and what specific benefits it could bring to e-Learning and mLearning development. Participants will also learn the potential roadblocks to HTML5 adoption (both in terms of development and delivery), and the status of HTML5 up to the current day with regard to issues that affect e-Learning and mLearning: development tools, technical capabilities, and desktop and mobile browser adoption.

In this session, you will learn:
  • What HTML5 is and what kind of learning experience it is capable of delivering
  • How an HTML5-based workflow can benefit instructional designers and developers, as well as their clients and audiences
  • The current roadblocks to HTML5 adoption and what they mean for your development team
  • How the major e-Learning development software stacks up for developing and delivering HTML5 content
Audience: Novice, intermediate, and advanced designers, developers, managers, and others. Familiarity with e-Learning or general Web development tools and techniques would be helpful, but is not required.
Judy Katz
Senior Instructional Designer
Nike
Judy Unrein specializes in designing eLearning and blended learning solutions. She speaks and writes regularly about learning design and technology for a variety of organizations and publications. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in English, an M.B.A, and an M.Ed. in Instructional Design, and has worked in the learning and development industry since 1997 as a trainer, project manager, and learning designer.
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304

What Do You Communicate? Communication Styles in a Virtual Environment

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

Every day we interact with others in an attempt to communicate. Every word we speak and every action we take communicates something about us. This session will help you understand the various forms of communication, identify communication styles of others, and learn how to “adapt” your style to improve communication.

Participants in this workshop will learn how to improve your communication style. You’ll learn four key strategies to bridge the communication style gap, and how to improve your communication style by highlighting your strengths and controlling and minimizing your weaknesses. By the end of the session, you’ll be able to apply what you learn immediately, to identify your personal communication style, understand the various forms of communication, and identify the communication styles of others.

In this session, you will learn:
  • The four key elements crucial to communicating in a virtual environment
  • How to use a range of actions to enhance your communication style
  • How to apply strategies for enhancing the quality of your communication style
  • How to adapt your personal communication style to improve your communication
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, managers, and others who want to understand and recognize the different types of communication styles.
Greta Rice
Training Consultant
UnitedHealthcare Health Services
Greta Rice is a dynamic training and sales strategist with over fifteen years of established achievement in providing results-focused training, achieving record-breaking sales outcomes for worldwide and start-up organizations. She has a record of achievement in the pharmaceutical, medical device, and health service industries. She has worked with various companies, driving sales growth and training others to exceed while providing award-winning leadership in highly competitive markets. Her clients have included United Healthcare Health services, Janssen Pharmaceutical and Ethicon Inc. (both divisions of Johnson and Johnson), and American Red Cross.
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305

Social Learning without the Technology - Seven Patterns to Try Out

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

It’s amusing when people speak of social learning and technology-enabled learning almost in the same breath. It's as if social learning is impossible without the help of technology. It's odd – didn't people have coffee table conversations before the age of social media? Did people not learn from each other? The recent explosion of the social Web accelerates this process, but social learning is hardly a phenomenon solely dependent on technology.

Participants in this session will discover seven different patterns you might want to try out before you even take the plunge into technology-enabled methods to facilitate social learning. While you're likely to still need technology, by applying some of these patterns you'll have taken several high-impact steps to influence your organization's learning culture. You’ll learn that your lobby, your pantry, your cafeteria, your all-hands meetings, and your project onboarding practices are all opportunities for you to create the context for social learning. You will be able to identify and implement some high-value human elements that build the foundation for any collaborative learning you'd like to facilitate at the workplace.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How refacing your team spaces can help facilitate learning
  • How open-space conferences are high intensity, low-investment activities you can arrange next week
  • Onboarding patterns that can make learning a breeze
  • Why technology isn't a silver bullet, and how you can use people to create the buzz for learning
Audience: Intermediate designers and developers with a basic understanding of LMSs, e-Learning, and social media.
Sumeet Moghe
Director, Knowledge and Learning Services
ThoughtWorks
Sumeet Moghe is a L&D professional with about a decade's experience in various aspects of our trade. He’s worked with IT and ITES organizations throughout his career and has seen the world both as a client and an internal service provider. By education, he’s a technologist – he holds a Master’s in Computer Applications. In eLearning, he is the author of www.learninggeneralist.com, and he’s featured as a recognized blogger on several lists. His passion is to marry technology and common-sense educational practices to create learning experiences that are “best of breed.”
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306

Bringing Content to Life: Creating Simulations from Scratch

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

All instructional designers face being required to create boring, read-and-click e-Learning. And you know that when learners are faced with a wall of text, they tend to tune out from the learning experience. A simulation is a great solution for this. Unfortunately, simulation software is expensive, and most designers will not have the budget to purchase these tools.

Participants in this session will learn how to format the information in an e-Learning course so that the learners feel that they are involved in the outcome, because they will have the ability to make decisions and see the results of their actions. You’ll see simulations built in PowerPoint to show that interesting and interactive e-Learning is possible without a huge price tag. You’ll get tips on formatting e-Learning to better involve the learner, how to reformat your current training to provide a better experience, and how to create more interesting training going forward. You’ll learn how to do this with the tools you already have.

In this session, you will learn:
  • Interactive formatting for e-Learning
  • Engaging the learner as an active participant
  • Ways to create a simulation without a budget
  • Best-practice tips for simulations
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers and developers with intermediate knowledge of PowerPoint and a basic knowledge of instructional design.
Kevin Thorn
Chief NuggetHead and Owner
NuggetHead Studioz
Kevin Thorn is an award-winning eLearning designer with over 30 years’ experience in the training industry, with the last decade in eLearning. After retiring from the Army as a trainer, Kevin earned a Technology Management degree in pursuit of an IT career. When his interest in technology mashed with his passion for training, he found a new career in eLearning. Kevin’s experience in instructional design, storyboarding, eLearning development, LMS implementation, illustration, graphic design, storytelling, cartooning, and comics provides an awareness and knowledge to successfully work any eLearning project from cradle to grave.
Brian Dusablon
Learning Technology Consultant
Learning Ninjas
Brian Dusablon has been in the learning industry since 1998 as a content developer, instructional designer, LMS administrator, project manager, and consultant. He currently works with organizations to apply existing and emerging technologies to improve performance. He founded Emergent Radio, where he co-hosts a Podcast called The ToolBar, focused on learning technology and design. He has written for Learning Solutions and eLearn magazines. He holds a B.B.A. degree in performance improvement technologies from Baylor University.
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307

Emerging Instructional Design and Outcome Measurement Strategies

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

As the e-Learning industry continues to expand, it is important for all practitioners to understand that generating desired participant outcomes is more than graphics and Flash interactions. It is imperative to know what instructional practices in synchronous and asynchronous training formats result in participant change. Secondly, much of the research literature on e-Learning training formats utilizes perception and preference measures rather than quantitative measures on behavioral change. To further support the validity of e-Learning, in addition to cost and time savings, we need to collect reliable outcomes measures in applied settings.

Participants in this session will get a series of evidence-based instructional strategies that you can incorporate into asynchronous and synchronous training formats. You’ll learn the steps of incorporating these into a variety of training formats and see a variety of e-Learning projects where they have been included into existing projects. You’ll also learn two simple research structures that you can use in a variety of educational, business, and non-profit settings to identify the efficacy of training materials.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to determine if the literature supports current instructional design practices
  • Some instructional design components that you can incorporate into asynchronous e-Learning
  • Some instructional design components that you can incorporate into synchronous e-Learning
  • Two simple research designs to quickly assess the effectiveness of e-Learning activities
Audience: Intermediate and advanced designers, developers, managers, and others who have experience designing e-Learning activities and who want to know how to assess current practices and evaluate future work.
Jason Gibson
Director of Research, Learning, and Behavior
Kentucky Education Development Corporation
Jason Gibson is an emerging researcher in the area of using Web 2.0 solutions to accomplish learning and behavioral change for children, students, and adults. Jason received his B.S. in Psychology from Appalachian State University, his Master’s at Florida State University, and he is a doctoral candidate at the University of Kentucky (UK). He also holds a graduate certificate in Distance Education Program Administration from UK.
Jason Carroll
Instructional Technology Consultant
Innovative Communications Group
Jason Carroll is an instructional technology consultant out of Lexington, KY with expertise in synchronous and asynchronous Web-based learning technologies. Jason's experience ranges from working with school systems to large organizations in the area of instructional technology and design. His focus is on bridging the gap between operation of technology and actual implementation, which he speaks on frequently at the national level.
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308

Linking mLearning to Your Business Strategy

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

Are you ready to move beyond gadgetry to real results with mobile technology? Explore what leading organizations are doing to closely link their mobile projects to business strategy and outcomes. We will examine examples from industry, government, and academia.

In this session, you will learn:
  • Guidelines for successfully using mobile to meet organizational goals
  • Novel ways to increase productivity with mobile learning
  • About case studies from J & J, Google, Microsoft, Dept of Defense, and hospital systems and universities
  • How to develop your own analysis and metrics toolset from the examples presented
Audience: Those wanting to understand how mLearning can fit into their organization are learning strategy.
David Metcalf, Ph.D.
Senior Researcher and Director
Institute for Simulation & Training METIL, University of Central Florida
Dr. David Metcalf explores leading-edge innovations in learning. Specific areas of focus include learning-business strategy, performance measurement, operational excellence, outsourcing, blended learning, and mobile learning. Dr. Metcalf was formerly the Chief Learning Technologist at RWD Technologies. He joined RWD with the sale of his NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) laboratory spin-off company, Merrimac. Prior to the spin-off, he was the Lead Multimedia Designer at NASA KSC. Dr. Metcalf is the author of several recent works including Blended eLearning: Integrating Knowledge, Performance Support and Online Learning, Operational Excellence, and mLearning: Mobile Learning and Performance.
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309

Rapid e-Learning Development with SME Collaboration

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

In today's environment, learning content must be produced and disseminated more rapidly than ever. Traditional development cycles can no longer keep up with the demands of management, customers, and students. Subject Matter Experts are more important than ever in this effort. Developers often do not have the time to come up to speed on a new technology, product, regulation, etc. SMEs have the knowledge, but all too often they lack the necessary presentation skills to present that knowledge effectively. The problem is – how do we work within these constraints?

Participants in this session will learn several concrete strategies and techniques for effectively working with a SME who lacks presentation skills to produce learning content that will engage the students' attention. You will learn how to bring some of the dynamics of a live classroom experience to an asynchronous e-Learning environment. These strategies will work with whatever development tools you use, no matter how complex or rudimentary.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to rapidly create content using SME resources
  • How to guide a SME to present content effectively
  • How to bring the feel of a live event to e-Learning
  • How to enhance the immediacy of your e-Learning content
  • How to produce content under a very short deadline
  • How to create a surrogate student in e-Learning development
Audience: Novice, intermediate, and advanced designers, developers, and others who have worked with SMEs and who would like to improve their effectiveness of working with SMEs.
Glenn Tapley
Rich Media Developer
Cisco
Glenn Tapley is currently a member of the Learning@Cisco Rich Media Team and devotes most of his time to developing innovative mobile learning content. He has been a technical trainer for twenty years and has been developing training to support Cisco technologies and products for more than 11 years. Glenn holds a B.A. in Theatre Arts and an M.B.A. in Finance.
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310

Fine-tuning Your Blended Learning Development and Implementation Process

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

Incorporating e-Learning into your organization’s current training mix can be complex. However, there are proven steps you can take to ensure your development and implementation process avoids common pitfalls.

Participants in this session will learn a process and design used to ensure effective application of skills after completing training. This process includes pre-work, training, and post-training follow-up, and constitutes an effective approach for promoting skill and competency development. You’ll learn the actions taken, the lessons learned, the outcomes, and how to collect and evaluate metrics.
 
In this session, you will learn:
  • How to organize and structure a blended-learning development program
  • How to drive results through a blended-learning approach to training
  • How to build accountability into the program
  • How to implement a follow-up process in multiple locations
  • How to use reinforcement techniques and practices to get higher levels of on-the-job training application
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, managers, and others familiar with the traditional instructional design process.

Sandee Rusiniak
Senior Instructional Designer
SR Consulting
Sandee Rusiniak is a Instructional Design professional who holds a M.A. in Human Performance and Training. In addition to several years in business management, Sandee has over 15 years of experience designing and developing training for education and the wireless communication industry.
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311

The Mac Unleashed

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

With the resurgence of all things Apple, there has been much interest in what the Mac ecosystem can bring to the e-Learning environment. However, purchasing Apple hardware to “test the waters” isn’t always feasible.

In this case-study session, participants will learn how to leverage the Mac ecosystem on both individual and institutional levels to save time and create better content. In this interactive session, participants will see how Northcentral Technical College (NTC) is leveraging the Mac ecosystem to build and enhance its e-Learning offerings. You’ll get tips on how the Mac can be used to great effect on the individual e-Learning development level as well.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How the Mac ecosystem can cut overall e-Learning development time
  • How the Mac ecosystem can help the visual impact of your e-Learning content
  • How numerous low cost, high impact Mac apps can be applied to e-Learning
  • How one killer Mac app has completely changed how NTC serves up online courses, and saved hours of faculty time
Audience:
Novice, intermediate, and advanced designers, developers, managers, and others who are active Mac users or who are wondering what the Mac environment can bring to e-Learning.
Michael Enders
E-Learning Manager
Articulate
Mike Enders is an eLearning manager at Articulate. His eclectic background includes stints working in leadership development, running a martial arts studio, teaching psychology, and building a custom eLearning company. Mike is an award-winning educator and eLearning developer and has been the recipient of bronze and honorable mention awards in the Articulate Guru competition. He also captured the award for best software system solution at SolutionFest 2013.
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312

How Attractive Learning Leads to Engaging Content

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 02:30 PM

Creating engaging learning has been the buzz word of late, however to get engaged one must first get attracted. Understanding what engages learners is almost an impossible task, as engagement is a very personal feeling. However understanding what attracts a learner and creates the “want” to learn will lead to engagement with the learning content. Moving a learner to having the “want” to learn is the requirement to create an engaging time for the learner.

Session participants will learn that creating attractive learning is a scientific formula of knowing who the learner is, creating the “draw” to hold their attention, and, having fulfilled their need, leaving them satisfied. You’ll learn who the learner is, which group of six known groups they will fall into, what their expectation is likely to be, how they will be attracted to the learning, and what will eventually lead them to an engaging experience.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to create attractive learning
  • How to engage the learner by knowing their expectation
  • What is required to create attractive learning
  • How to change your content so the learner “wants” to engage with it
Audience:
Intermediate designers, developers, and others.
Neil Lasher
Senior Instructional Designer
FireEye
Neil Lasher, the senior instructional designer for FireEye, is a Fellow of the UK Learning and Performance Institute. Over the last 25 years, Neil has assisted hundreds of companies of all sizes with their learning design and strategy. In 2012 Neil worked for the organizing committee of the London 2012 Olympics, helping to roll out one million hours of learning to 200,000 contractors and volunteers. A recognized expert and thought leader in instructional design and workplace analytics for using technology in learning, Neil is now part of a team of experts delivering learning at FireEye, ranked fourth on the Deloitte 2012 Technology Fast 500.
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401

Implementation: THE Critical Success Factor for Your e-Learning

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

Great content, excellent design, effective tools, and the right technologies are all certainly necessary to the success of any e-Learning program, whether course or LMS/LCMS. However, if that’s all you have, you may well end up with a fantastic program, but no learners wanting to use it, managers willing to support it, or an organization that makes it a priority. In order to ensure people use your e-Learning, use it effectively, and that it produces the results you’ve designed it to requires that you take its implementation seriously. By applying proven techniques and approaches from change management and consumer marketing, you can develop an implementation plan to motivate your learners, engage your managers, and energize your organization.

Participants in this session will learn what works and what doesn’t — and why — when it comes to successfully implementing your e-Learning. You will leave understanding how successful companies are applying a comprehensive framework for successfully implementing e-Learning based on the innovative and proven I-3 Change Implementation Model.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to analyze the critical implementation issues for your organization
  • How to develop an implementation strategy, based on proven change management techniques and consumer marketing methods in your implementation plan
  • How to define and describe a specific action plan in support of that strategy
  • How to identify and describe the I-3 Change Implementation Model
Audience: This session is for all; no prerequisite knowledge or skill is required.
Lance Dublin
CEO & Chief Solution Architect
Dublin Consulting
Lance Dublin is an independent consultant based in San Francisco, California who specializes in corporate learning and change management. His emphasis is on strategy development, program design and change implementation. He has over 30 years of experience in adult education and training, communication and change leadership, and motivation and innovation. Lance is co-author of the book Implementing e-Learning, which was published by ASTD in 2002. He is a highly regarded speaker and workshop leader at national and international conferences. Lance was the founder and CEO of Dublin Group, a company that for 12 years provided custom performance improvement and change implementation solutions to Fortune 1000 clients. Prior to this, Lance was the founder and Provost of Antioch University/West, an accredited bachelor's and master's degree program.
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402

Lessons Learned from 200 Rapid e-Learning Gurus

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

One of the most popular features in almost any e-Learning community is examples of e-Learning courses. Unfortunately those are few and far between. And for many people the examples that are visible are outside of their skill level or budget. Not all e-Learning designers have big budgets or production teams – many work by themselves and struggle to create good courses with limited time and resources.

In this session, we’ll review key points of interest from the 200 e-Learning courses submitted for the recent Articulate Guru awards. We’ll look at the diverse instructional design strategies, navigation techniques, branched scenarios, and the techniques applied to the various courses.

In this session, you will learn:
  • That not all courses have to be the same … there's not always a right and a wrong way
  • How to reproduce some of the ideas inspired by the e-Learning examples
  • How to create different ways to appraoch your course design
  • How to implement techniques used in common course designs like menu structures, navigation, and animation
Audience:
Novice, intermediate, and advanced designers, developers, managers, executives, and others.
Tom Kuhlmann
VP, Community
Articulate
Tom Kuhlmann has close to 20 years' experience in the training industry, where he’s developed hundreds of hours of eLearning, and managed eLearning projects at organization such as Capital One, Washington Mutual, and Weyerhaeuser. Currently, Tom runs the user community for Articulate, with a focus on building a passionate community of rapid eLearning developers. He also authors the popular Rapid E-Learning Blog, which has almost 55,000 subscribers. Tom holds a Master’s degree in Education Technology from Pepperdine University, where he researched how to cultivate communities of practice through the development of personal expertise.
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403

A Recipe for Integrating Your Course Content into SharePoint

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

Why should your high-value content be available only in the classroom? With the proliferation of SharePoint sites in the enterprise, why not provide access to your content via a community of practice? But how do you take face-to-face speaker support content and distribute it across a SharePoint site in an engaging, self-paced format?

Session participants will get a step-by-step recipe for taking classroom course content and distributing it throughout a SharePoint site using common Web parts. In this session, we will take a module of classroom content and create a recipe for distributing the content throughout a SharePoint site so that it is both engaging for the learner and manageable for the administrator.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How to “chunk” your content to prepare it for SharePoint
  • How to plan the layout of a SharePoint site to match your learning objectives
  • How to modify common SharePoint lists and Web parts
  • How to develop a plan for migrating classroom content to a SharePoint site
Audience: Novice designers, developers, managers, and others. There is no particular knowledge required, but familiarity with SharePoint pages, lists, and Web parts is a plus.
Darryl Toney
Learning Technology Consultant
Agilent Technologies
Darryl Toney is a Learning Technology Consultant at Agilent. Over the past 15 years of working in high technology, he has implemented training and HRIS systems at Agilent and SGI. He has experience managing Desktop & Technical training and supporting online communities.
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404

Reaching New Heights: Interactive Webinars for Pharma Sales Reps

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

This session will offer a case study that brought the art of the Webinar to new heights. While working with a pharmaceutical client, Maritz Canada was able to reach across business units and deliver multiple engaging and interactive two-hour Webinars on entrepreneurial decision making. Pharmaceutical sales representatives experienced an environment that allowed for practice and application, as well as collaboration with peers and cross-functional team members.

Participants in this case-study session will learn how to change the trend of the “talking head” and text-laden PowerPoint slides. You’ll learn an approach to design and implementation and discover how to change the face of future Webinars in this environment. Participants will have learned practical skills for designing and implementing interactive Webinars with a selection of tools to help reduce spending and increase engagement within your organization.

In this session, you will learn:
  • Various design approaches for interactive Webinars
  • Creative ways of using different tool sets
  • How to apply practical methods for designing and developing an interactive Webinar for their environment
  • The value proposition to convince stakeholders of the benefits of interactive Webinars
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, and others who have sat through boring Webinars and who have been tasked with designing and implementing engaging Webinars.
Mary Myers
Learning Strategist
Maritz Canada
Mary Myers has over 10 years' experience in designing and implementing learning initiatives to match corporate or organizational strategies. Mary’s instructional design experience has touched many sectors, including Retail (Canadian Tire, Honda, A&W), Technology (Research In Motion, IBM, CA, Rogers), Financial Services (IFIC, CIFP, Bank of America, AllianceBernstein, KPMG, Marsh), Life Sciences (Johnson & Johnson, Jansen Cilag, Sanofi Aventis) and Public (TVOntario, Canada Post). She was also part of a team that won the Brandon Hall 2008 Custom Content award for a New Employee Training initiative for A&W Restaurants Canada.
Christine Keene
President
Keene Innovations Consulting
Christine Keene is the president of Keene Innovations Consulting. Her passion is learning and development, and inspiring this passion in others. Through Keene Innovations, she partners with organizations and teams to grow, twist, and turn thinking. She collaborates to transform this thinking into action, propelling organizations forward. Christine has had over 15 years of experience in training, marketing, and sales in both the pharmaceutical and financial sectors. Christine has a BSc in biochemistry and is currently working towards a master of design degree in strategic foresight and innovation.
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405

Twitter's Next Level: Integrating Twitter into Your Workplace

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

Everyone knows what Twitter is now – it's become almost ubiquitous (especially at a Guild conference!). But how on earth can you apply it in the workplace, or convince your boss it's not simply people sharing information about their coffee?

Participants will get a brief overview of Twitter itself, but then will learn how companies are using Twitter for everything from outreach to communication. You’ll review different applications that are available for the enterprise level, as well as different ways to apply Twitter and its third-party applications to help you do your job. You’ll see examples of using Twitter for tech support and discuss the challenges. You’ll learn that Twitter CAN be relevant on the job, and you’ll see examples and get information on tools that will be easy to take back home and apply quickly to existing training and topics. Because we encourage discussion and sharing, please think of examples of how you are using Twitter in your workplace.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How other companies are successfully using Twitter for outreach and customer support
  • How your peers are using Twitter via facilitated discussion
  • About third-party and enterprise-level applications that will help integrate Twitter into your jobs
  • How to integrate Twitter into instructor-led presentations
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, and others. You should have your own Twitter account and be familiar with Twitter basics.
Michelle Lentz
Senior Learning Technologist
Oracle
Michelle Lentz is a senior learning technologist at Oracle. Michelle has been in learning and development for nearly 20 years. Previously director of training at Trivantis, she has also owned Write Technology for 10 years. Michelle has taught social media seminars across the country and specializes in the intersection between social media and instructional design. In addition to her work at Oracle, Michelle is the executive editor of Brian Solis’s Silicon Valley-focused blog as well as editor of an award-winning blog on wine.
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406

E-Learning Rules of Engagement

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

One main challenge of e-Learning courses is keeping learners engaged throughout the entire delivery of the content in order to not only see value in taking the time to complete the course but to also retain the information being discussed and/or presented.

Participants in this session will get information, tips, and techniques on how to use various tools such as PowerPoint and a rapid authoring tool such as Articulate to create engaging e-Learning modules. All e-Learning content developers experience the same challenge of keeping the learner’s attention while trying to deliver the content so that it will be retained. This session will allow novice content creators to start off on the right foot, so that the learner receives and retains their content.

In this session, you will learn:

  • Why engagement of the learner is so important
  • The tools available for helping create engaging content
  • Techniques for creating engaging content
  • From examples of engaging e-Learning modules
Audience: Novice designers, developers, and others with a working knowledge of PowerPoint and a rapid content authoring tool such as Articulate.
Christian Filiaggi
Senior Training Specialist/Chief e-Learning Officer
PrimeVest Financial Services, Inc.
Christian Filiaggi is responsible for the design and delivery of sales and technology training for clients of PrimeVest Financial Services. This content is delivered through classroom-led, Web-conference, and electronic-media blended learning events. Christian holds a B.A. in Business Management from St. John's University (Collegeville, MN) and has been a field trainer in various roles for 10 years.
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407

Seven Tips for Using Embedded, Mobile, and Observational Assessments

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

Until recently, online assessments were presented in isolation, occupying an entire computer screen and – presumably – the learner’s undivided attention! Such assessments still play a vital role, but just as videos are now embedded within a Web page alongside other content, so too are quizzes and surveys. These assessments are right at home within learning mashups that combine text, videos, Podcasts, graphics, and other learning materials in many settings and contexts including SharePoint and other portals, wikis, blogs, and social networking sites. You can also deliver them to mobile devices, for use directly by the learner or as part of an observational or workplace assessment in which an instructor or supervisor rates a person’s performance on a task.

Participants in this session will learn how to use knowledge checks, surveys, and other assessments to provide retrieval practice and collect valuable data. You’ll learn seven tips for deploying effective embedded and mobile assessments. You’ll learn techniques for efficient question authoring and organization, delivering a single assessment to multiple environments, conducting observational assessments, and using feedback and assessment data to enhance the learning process. You’ll get practical advice about how to gather data and provide effective retrieval practice in the midst of a learning activity.

In this session, you will learn:
  • Potential applications for embedded and mobile assessments
  • Principles for matching embedded and mobile assessments to the learning need
  • How to enhance learning mashups with embedded assessments
  • Techniques for running observational assessments using mobile devices
Audience: Intermediate and advanced designers, developers, and managers who have some experience with authoring, administering, and managing assessments or assessment programs.
Jeff Place
Assessment Evangelist
Questionmark Corporation
Jeff Place has been in the training, development, and eLearning industry for more than 10 years. Jeff was a corporate trainer on Nike's “Go Team,” training retail staff on product knowledge, customer service, and salesmanship. He has advised businesses on the use of eLearning platforms, and guided corporations, government agencies, and academic institutions in the use of computerized assessments. He has presented at various conferences, including ASTD, the Association of Test Publishers, the National College Testing Association, and the League for Innovation in the Community College. A graduate of Brigham Young University, Jeff lives in Salt Lake City.
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408

Managing Learning Content in Microsoft Word

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

With all the various ways in which learning and development professionals deliver content to their learners, finding an efficient way to manage content is always a challenge. Having the same content delivered in e-Learning, mobile, and classroom usually means managing content updates and delivering new content in different files and different formats. Enterprise content management systems and learning content management systems are expensive and complex to implement. This problem is exacerbated as organizations struggle with larger and larger volumes of legacy content and the speed at which content requires updating.

Participants in this case-study session will examine a pilot project conducted at a Canadian Government sector council where Open Office Markup Language (OOML) in Word was used to build content management capabilities. You’ll learn about the Forum for International Trade Training sector council's business challenge, the results of a professional analysis conducted around that challenge, see the solution architecture and how it addressed the business challenge, and see live demonstrations of the solution. Participants will learn a practical way to manage content with a low-cost, technologically advanced application using Microsoft Word and the OOML standard as an alternative to the expensive, proprietary complex learning content management systems.

In this session, you will learn:
  • The business challenge surrounding content management
  • What OOML is
  • How to harness OOML in Word for content management
  • A new application for single-sourcing content in Word
Audience:
Intermediate and advanced designers, developers, managers, and others who know what a content management system is and are familiar with what XML standards are.
Reuben Tozman
CEO
SlideJar
Reuben Tozman is the founder and CEO of SlideJar, a cloud-based asset management company. Reuben is the co-founder and former CLO of edCetra Training, which is known for its structured approach to instructional design. As an instructional designer, Reuben advanced his career by managing production teams and product development, and he began his first company in 2002. Reuben Tozman published Learning On Demand: How the Evolution of Technology is Shaping the Future of Learning in 2012 and has been an active contributor to industry publications for the last 10 years.
Rob Gnaedinger
Director, International Trade Resources
Forum for International Trade Training
Rob Gnaedinger, currently Director of International Trade Resources for FITT, one of the world's leading providers of international trade training, is a Project Management Professional (PMP) and a Certified International Trade Professional (CITP). Prior to joining FITT, Rob was a Project Manager in the Telecommunications sector, managing the release of many global projects. He has made various presentations in his discipline.
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409

Online Brainstorming Techniques for Development Teams

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

Does your group have a problem to solve? If your team works virtually, or doesn’t always see eye-to-eye, online brainstorming techniques can help give everyone a chance to contribute to developing a solution.

In this session, you’ll learn that when teams can’t meet in the same real space, online brainstorming can work just as well. In this session, we’ll discuss different brainstorming tools and approaches teams can use to solve problems as a group.

In this session, you will learn:

  • How brainstorming really helps teams
  • The blind spots that group brainstorming can’t fix
  • The advantages of synchronous vs. asynchronous brainstorming techniques
  • How the tools you already use can be adapted for online team brainstorming sessions
  • About new tools for brainstorming
Audience: All levels of designers, developers, managers, executives and others interested in improving the output of development teams. There are no prerequisites.
Mary Arnold
MA Consulting
Mary Arnold is a Gen-X digital native who got pulled into working with technology in her first job out of college, where she was frequently called on by her co-workers to explain how to use the user-spiteful computer system in her office. Having grown up with computers (thanks, Dad!), she’s never been afraid to experiment with them until they work the way a user would expect. She is currently working as an instructional technologist, uses Flash extensively for her online learning projects, and probably spends more time than she should in social media.
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410

Developing Distance Learning with a One-person Team

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

Many companies are faced with the difficulty of developing quality distance learning materials with limited human and equipment-related resources. In this session, participants will learn how companies can produce inexpensive, quality distance learning with a one-man or -woman department. You’ll learn practical techniques for streamlining processes and reducing overhead through the use of agile principles, simple line art, and the assistance of a handful of open source applications. Participants that have management or distance-learning developer roles within companies will be able to more readily apply Agile principles to complement the product development process while adjusting the distance learning workflow for one person. You’ll learn to use open source applications to reduce software costs, and find new ways to use simple line art in place of expensive alternatives.

In this session, you will learn:
  • How the application of Agile principles can complement distance learning development processes
  • How to adjust workflows into manageable sprints for one
  • That quality graphics can be just a stick figure away
  • How open source applications can reduce software costs and still provide quality materials
Audience: Novice and intermediate designers, developers, and others familiar with the basic processes that surround the development of distance learning materials.
Will Miller
Instructional Designer
Edline
Will Miller has been involved in almost every aspect of distance learning including instructional design, project management, graphic design, and distance-learning development. Before joining Edline, Will instructed multiple adult-education courses to diverse learners and developed course curricula that gained statewide recognition among community colleges in Illinois. Will holds a M.S.Ed. in Workforce Education and Development.
Kenneth Torgerson
Strategic Initiatives Program Manager
Pearson School Systems
Ken Torgerson has been involved in technology and education for nearly 20 years, teaching the Hmong language, teaching English as a Foreign Language in Taiwan, and supporting and training K-12 educators and administrators on student information systems for Apple, Pearson, and THiNQ Ed. Ken now devises strategies for improving learning about products at Pearson School Systems. He holds a B.A. in Anthropology from Brigham Young University and an M.A. in Education from the University of Phoenix.
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411

A Metrics-Performance-Learning-Driven System: A Case Study

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

Your LMS (Learning Management System) may surprise you: It can be a performance system to meet senior management’s needs for exacting, measurable, and traceable training results. People largely use LMSs for delivery of e-Learning and tracking of face–to-face learning as well as human resources planning and informal learning. But not very many LMSs users integrate it with real-numbers job-related performance data and get feedback to help leaders train, coach, and support their teams, and base their investment decisions on.

In this case-study session, a “Metrics-Performance-Learning-Driven” system will demonstrate how a LMS is the core platform that integrates all retail-stores and financial-services-advisor performance data with learning, coaching, and statistical reporting. The case covers a company with 2,500 global stores in the retail business and a financial services company with over 25,000 employees.

In this session, you will learn:
  • The statistical and qualitative data learned from the case studies
  • The conditions suitable to use a LMS as the core platform to integrate business and job performance data with developmental needs for employees and leaders
  • The key benefits that made senior management support the initiative
  • The roles of the e-Learning designers, leaders, and systems people
  • The step-by-step strategies and tactics that can apply in other organizations
  • The fundamental shifts in software design, instructional design, work redesign, and leadership practices that support the metrics-driven approach
Audience: Intermediate designers, developers, managers, and others who understand the workings of LMSs and the requirements for reporting, ROI, and investment decisions.
Ray Jimenez
Chief Learning Architect
Vignettes Learning
Ray Jimenez, PhD, the chief learning architect of Vignettes Learning, spent 15 years with Coopers & Lybrand in the areas of management consulting and implementation of learning technology solutions. Ray has worked with Neiman Marcus, NASA, Pixar Studios, and the California Institute of Technology. Ray is the author of 3-Minute e-Learning, Scenario-Based Learning, and Do-It-Yourself eLearning.
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412

Eight Design Lessons We Can Learn from Museums

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 04:00 PM

What can instructional and information designers learn about structuring self-study asynchronous e-Learning courses from museum exhibit designers who design free-choice learning environments?  

Participants in this session will learn eight specific lessons. You’ll learn from a report on the results of a critical study of 50 museums, and then how the lessons transfer to the structuring of self-study asynchronous e-Learning tutorials and other types of practical Web-based materials.

In this session, you will learn:
  • Why studying the design of museum exhibits offers appropriate and unique insights for designing e-Learning programs  
  • Three broad categories of information architecture for learning programs  
  • For each category, its uses, strengths, and limitations 
Audience: Intermediate designers and developers who have designed at least three e-learning programs. 
Saul Carliner
Director, Education Doctoral Program and Associate Professor
Concordia University
Saul Carliner’s research interests include emerging forms of online learning and communication for the workplace, and the management of groups that produce these materials. Also an industry consultant, Saul provides strategic-planning services and workshops for clients such as Alltel Wireless, Bell Canada, the Bronx Zoo, IBM, Lowe's, and several U.S. and Canadian federal agencies. Saul has published seven books and 140 articles, is a board member of the Canadian Society for Training and Development, is a past ASTD research fellow, and is a Society for Technical Communication fellow and past international president.
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