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by Julie Dirksen

As an instructional designer, how do you handle situations where there’s not a knowledge problem? Where people know what to do, but just don’t do it? Here’s a review of a recent research study on the influence of visceral experience on behavior. It will suggest a way that you may want to try when dealing with these cases.

Research   |   April 18, 2013
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by Karl Kapp

In a recent article in Learning Solutions Magazine, “Why Games Don’t Teach,” Ruth Clark says it’s “not that games can’t teach, but that advocating games as a main or even frequent instructional strategy is misleading.” Karl Kapp disagrees and offers this counterpoint, including evidence from research showing that games are effective teachers.

Feature   |   March 4, 2013
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by Ruth Clark

Ask trainers to define what they mean by the term “game” and you will likely hear a mix of features or examples. The problem is that many things that could be called a game do not necessarily lead to learning. A leader in the field of instructional technology takes on the question: Is it right to advocate games as a main or frequent instructional strategy?

Feature   |   February 19, 2013
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by Bill Brandon

The next target of disintermediation is diplomas, certifications, and other “official” records of learning, skills, and knowledge. A number of organizations are promoting a credentialing approach that awards “badges” directly to learners from providers. Learners can maintain and publicly display their badge portfolios independent of employers. Read about these new initiatives here.

Feature   |   January 28, 2013
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by News Editor

The MIT Game Lab has released A Slower Speed of Light, a game that illustrates some conceptually challenging physics and math. As a kind of proof of concept, A Slower Speed of Light also demonstrates the Game Lab’s new OpenRelativity toolset.

News   |   January 23, 2013
11    0

by Mayra Villar

Recent research challenges the assumption that games are not an appropriate channel for learning. By focusing on delivering the necessary experience, designers can produce meaningful, engaging eLearning as games. Here are guidelines to effective mechanics, story, aesthetics, and technology selection that support contextualized practice, invitation to action, and self-assessment of decisions.

Feature   |   January 14, 2013
48    1

by Neil Lasher

Is the handwriting on the wall for eLearning? The design, development, and delivery of content intended to facilitate learning have undergone many changes. Perhaps it is time to change the way we are doing things. If you believe that eLearning is not providing sufficient value for anything other than “tick box compliance,” read this for a different direction that you may want to consider.

Feature   |   November 26, 2012
65    6

by News Editor

Axonify has launched the next generation of its breakthrough eLearning platform, designed to change the way employees learn, retain, and apply knowledge in the workplace. Axonify reinforces critical learning by delivering bite-sized content on a daily basis, using game mechanics and brain science to drive engagement and real learning transfer.

News   |   September 4, 2012
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by Jennifer Neibert

For anyone who thinks education in America isn’t quite right and wants to do something about it, add Clark Aldrich’s Unschooling Rules to your summer reading list. This quick read of Aldrich’s 55 common-sense insights will surely pique your interest. And you may soon find yourself unlearning everything you know about schools in America today.

Review   |   August 8, 2012
12    1

by Jennifer Neibert

If you’re up to the challenge, Karl Kapp’s latest book offers best practices, design considerations, and pragmatic recommendations that will surely change the way you think about enhancing your learning initiatives through the use of games.

Review   |   May 2, 2012
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