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by Jane Bozarth

Good practice is made up of work, and thought, and mistakes, and time. Things that look easy in the hands of a skilled professional are often the end result of years of practice and experience. Jane offers some sobering thoughts about what it takes to make things look easy.

Column   |   July 2, 2013
48    2

by Fil Arenas, Andrew Stricker

Developing a high degree of problem-solving skill is an important function of military training from the recruit level onward. The US Air Force Squadron Officer College engages students in collaborative, context-based problem-solving challenges in a virtual-world environment. This summary will be useful to any organization wishing to improve complex interpersonal skills in its leadership team.

Feature   |   June 17, 2013
15    3

by Jennifer Neibert

Engagement is a critical element of learning. For eLearning and mLearning engagement is arguably even more important, but it requires additional planning, monitoring, and creativity to do it well. If you’re looking for clever ideas to drive engagement in your learning initiatives, download 68 Tips for eLearning Engagement and Interactivity—free from The eLearning Guild—today!

News   |   May 21, 2013
21    0

by Nic Laycock

Talent shortages are becoming a feature of life for many companies and many industries. The need is great, but qualified replacements are hard to find and hard to keep. A company in Holland provides serious games to help develop talent and to help identify the best candidates. Read about it here!

News   |   May 9, 2013
7    1

by Jack McGrath

“Simulation” is a technique that is useful across many different instructional situations. By far the most important task in designing effective simulations is creating scenarios that reflect the real world. The story arc model can help you master this challenge.

Tip   |   April 30, 2013
35    1

by Julie Dirksen

As an instructional designer, how do you handle situations where there’s not a knowledge problem? Where people know what to do, but just don’t do it? Here’s a review of a recent research study on the influence of visceral experience on behavior. It will suggest a way that you may want to try when dealing with these cases.

Research   |   April 18, 2013
29    0

by Karl Kapp

In a recent article in Learning Solutions Magazine, “Why Games Don’t Teach,” Ruth Clark says it’s “not that games can’t teach, but that advocating games as a main or even frequent instructional strategy is misleading.” Karl Kapp disagrees and offers this counterpoint, including evidence from research showing that games are effective teachers.

Feature   |   March 4, 2013
58    9

by Ruth Clark

Ask trainers to define what they mean by the term “game” and you will likely hear a mix of features or examples. The problem is that many things that could be called a game do not necessarily lead to learning. A leader in the field of instructional technology takes on the question: Is it right to advocate games as a main or frequent instructional strategy?

Feature   |   February 19, 2013
52    23

by Bill Brandon

The next target of disintermediation is diplomas, certifications, and other “official” records of learning, skills, and knowledge. A number of organizations are promoting a credentialing approach that awards “badges” directly to learners from providers. Learners can maintain and publicly display their badge portfolios independent of employers. Read about these new initiatives here.

Feature   |   January 28, 2013
55    4

by News Editor

The MIT Game Lab has released A Slower Speed of Light, a game that illustrates some conceptually challenging physics and math. As a kind of proof of concept, A Slower Speed of Light also demonstrates the Game Lab’s new OpenRelativity toolset.

News   |   January 23, 2013
11    0