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by Mark Lassoff

If you develop any type of learning content that is displayed in a mobile or traditional web browser, you should know about jQuery, a JavaScript library that is very powerful and also extremely easy to use. In this tutorial you’ll get a close look at a couple of the effects you can produce with just a little jQuery in your HTML code.

Column   |   September 18, 2014
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by Art Kohn

For many instructional designers and teachers, one finding from research is so puzzling that they reject it immediately: that infusing training with strategic difficulties and challenges dramatically improves the learner’s long-term retention. Shouldn’t learning be easy? This month, Professor Kohn looks at the research and begins the discussion of how to apply it.

Column   |   September 17, 2014
21    0

by Marc Rosenberg

Has technology in our schools come upon a significant barrier? Is it the schools themselves? Technology can improve learning, but we may never reach its full value if the context where it is used—the school—does not significantly change as well. There are efforts underway to change schools, but we still have to ask if they are enough. Read here about what it will take to change the game!

Column   |   September 9, 2014
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by Jane Bozarth

Needs assessment is critical to success in instructional design, but it is often left out for no good reason. (Expediency is not a sufficient excuse.) Here are a baker’s dozen of questions to ask.

Column   |   September 2, 2014
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by Art Kohn

Neuroscience has learned a lot about the way that the brain processes visual information. This article provides insights into the two distinct visual systems that operate concurrently and independently. Understanding these systems and how they work will provide instructional designers with important information bearing on ways to increase comprehension, retention, and transfer.

Column   |   August 14, 2014
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by Marc Rosenberg

We hear a lot about giving the learner something to do through interactivity and we hear a lot about engaging the learner. They are not the same thing. Interactivity does not necessarily create engagement, and engagement does not necessarily require overt interactivity. Learn about the difference here, and about the “Four T’s of Engagement.”

Column   |   August 12, 2014
71    3

by Jane Bozarth

“What gets measured gets done” and “If you don’t measure it, you can’t improve it” are two management maxims that have been around so long nobody is sure who said them first. But what is certain is that it’s not as simple as just starting to measure something. Here are two questions that will help you avoid bad measures.

Column   |   August 5, 2014
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by Art Kohn

Much of what we communicate in eLearning and other kinds of teaching relies on the written word. Many instructional designers worry that learners may be poor readers and so try to “write down to their level.” Is this the right approach? Is reading ability even a problem? Or is the problem our approach to writing? Here are some guidelines that may surprise you.

Column   |   July 17, 2014
24    1

by Marc Rosenberg

Selling performance support comes with unique challenges. Whether you are just getting started or have some performance-support experience under your belt, here are ten approaches to employ when planning to sell a performance-support project.

Column   |   July 8, 2014
10    1

by Jane Bozarth

Professional development—our own, personal, professional development—is one of the most important things we can invest in. This isn’t a matter of paying money, necessarily, but of paying time and attention on a regular, even daily, basis to consciously becoming better at what you do. How? Reflective practice. Reading this column could be the best thing you do for yourself today.

Column   |   July 1, 2014
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